. More about Copyright and Other Restrictions. Introduction. Watch Queue Queue. This document presents the Association of College and Research Libraries' (ACRL's) Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education, which were developed in 1999 by an ACRL Task Force working with the academic library community, teaching faculty, academic officers in higher education, and chief officers of the regional accrediting associations. Librarians have a greater responsibility in identifying core ideas within their own knowledge domain that can extend learning for students, in creating a new cohesive curriculum for information literacy, and in collaborating more extensively with faculty. (Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2004). This Framework depends on these core ideas of metaliteracy, with special focus on metacognition,9 or critical self-reflection, as crucial to becoming more self-directed in that rapidly changing ecosystem. formulate questions for research based on information gaps or on reexamination of existing, possibly conflicting, information; determine an appropriate scope of investigation; deal with complex research by breaking complex questions into simple ones, limiting the scope of investigations; use various research methods, based on need, circumstance, and type of inquiry; monitor gathered information and assess for gaps or weaknesses; synthesize ideas gathered from multiple sources; draw reasonable conclusions based on the analysis and interpretation of information. ACRL's Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education (hereafter referred to as the Standards) were published in 2000 and have had wide acceptance by librarians in colleges and universities in the United States and Canada and beyond.Many librarians base their information literacy (IL) instruction programs and assessment instruments on the Standards. Because this Framework envisions information literacy as extending the arc of learning throughout students’ academic careers and as converging with other academic and social learning goals, an expanded definition of information literacy is offered here to emphasize dynamism, flexibility, individual growth, and community learning: Information literacy is the set of integrated abilities encompassing the reflective discovery of information, the understanding of how information is produced and valued, and the use of information in creating new knowledge and participating ethically in communities of learning. 225 N. Michigan Ave. Suite 1300 Web Page. Elements that affect or reflect on the creation, such as a pre- or post-publication editing or reviewing process, may be indicators of quality. Some content may be protected under international law. Expedited shipping is available for an additional charge. 9. Information literacy competency standards for higher education. United States. Some sites in this collection may be restricted to onsite access only; see the Access Condition statement in each item record for more information. Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. The Framework is organized into six frames, each consisting of a concept central to information literacy, a set of knowledge practices, and a set of dispositions. This Revision Task Force is charged with reviewing and revising the current ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education, that were Adopted by the ACRL Board, January 11, 2016. Threshold concepts can be thought of as portals through which the learner must pass in order to develop new perspectives and wider understanding. develop and maintain an open mind when encountering varied and sometimes conflicting perspectives; motivate themselves to find authoritative sources, recognizing that authority may be conferred or manifested in unexpected ways; develop awareness of the importance of assessing content with a skeptical stance and with a self-awareness of their own biases and worldview; question traditional notions of granting authority and recognize the value of diverse ideas and worldviews; are conscious that maintaining these attitudes and actions requires frequent self-evaluation. Maybe that’s over-simplistic, but I think he has a point. During the fifteen years since the publication of the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education,1 academic librarians and their partners in higher education associations have developed learning outcomes, tools, and resources that some institutions have deployed to infuse information literacy concepts and skills into their curricula. consider research as open-ended exploration and engagement with information; appreciate that a question may appear to be simple but still disruptive and important to research; value intellectual curiosity in developing questions and learning new investigative methods; maintain an open mind and a critical stance; value persistence, adaptability, and flexibility and recognize that ambiguity can benefit the research process; seek multiple perspectives during information gathering and assessment; follow ethical and legal guidelines in gathering and using information; demonstrate intellectual humility (i.e., recognize their own intellectual or experiential limitations). undergraduates is founded on the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education (hereafter referred to as the Standards) designed by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) in 2000. 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information literacy competency standards for higher education

My friend read this article with me, and at the end of his reading, summed it up by saying: “Oh, now Google-fu has a name.”. Description based on print version record; resource not viewed. Two added elements illustrate important learning goals related to those concepts: knowledge practices,5 which are demonstrations of ways in which learners can increase their understanding of these information literacy concepts, and dispositions,6 which describe ways in which to address the affective, attitudinal, or valuing dimension of learning. Association of College and Research Libraries Information literacy is a key component of lifelong learning and is central to the mission of higher education. This process of inquiry extends beyond the academic world to the community at large, and the process of inquiry may focus upon personal, professional, or societal needs. Lori Townsend, Korey Brunetti, and Amy R. Hofer. ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education JavaScript disabled or chat unavailable. Research in scholarly and professional fields is a discursive practice in which ideas are formulated, debated, and weighed against one another over extended periods of time. This Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education (Framework) grows out of a belief that information literacy as an educational reform movement will realize its potential only through a richer, more complex set of core ideas. The International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) is a nonprofit organization that serves educators interested in better use of technology in education. Laying the foundation : digital humanities in academic libraries. Your donation to the ACRL Advancement Fund, which supports initiatives that strengthen ACRL’s influence in higher education and its ability to create diverse and inclusive communities in the association and the profession, assists us as we continuing to provide these important resources. Experts realize that information searching is a contextualized, complex experience that affects, and is affected by, the cognitive, affective, and social dimensions of the searcher. Information literacy is related to information technology skills but has broader implications for the individual, the educational system, and for society. Information resources reflect their creators’ expertise and credibility, and are evaluated based on the information need and the context in which the information will be used. Experts recognize that information creations are valued differently in different contexts, such as academia or the workplace. Description based on print version record; resource not viewed. “Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education” was approved by the Board of Directors of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ARCL) on January 18, 2000, at the Midwinter Meeting of the American Library Association … “Editors’ Preface.” In Threshold Concepts and Transformational Learning, edited by Jan H. F. Meyer, Ray Land, and Caroline Baillie, ix–xlii. Association Of College And Research Libraries. JustGarciaHill is committed to increasing the number of minorities entering science careers and to celebrating contributions to science by minority scientists. In 2000, the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), released "Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education", describing five standards and numerous performance indicators considered best practices for the implementation and assessment of postsecondary information literacy programs. To make a takedown request, please contact us via this contact form. Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education provides a framework for assessing the information literate individual. 2. It enables the conversation to move forward and strengthens one’s voice in the conversation. Communities of scholars, researchers, or professionals engage in sustained discourse with new insights and discoveries occurring over time as a result of varied perspectives and interpretations. 3 (2011): 853–69. In addition, this Framework draws significantly upon the concept of metaliteracy,7 which offers a renewed vision of information literacy as an overarching set of abilities in which students are consumers and creators of information who can participate successfully in collaborative spaces.8 Metaliteracy demands behavioral, affective, cognitive, and metacognitive engagement with the information ecosystem. It serves as a vehicle for sci-tech librarians to share successful initiatives and innovative ideas, and... Science and Technology Section - Association of College and Research Libraries. exhibit mental flexibility and creativity, understand that first attempts at searching do not always produce adequate results, realize that information sources vary greatly in content and format and have varying relevance and value, depending on the needs and nature of the search, seek guidance from experts, such as librarians, researchers, and professionals, recognize the value of browsing and other serendipitous methods of information gathering, persist in the face of search challenges, and know when they have enough information to complete the information task. . (2008) Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. See the. [Web Page] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/lcwaN0022456/. 4. Searching for information is often nonlinear and iterative, requiring the evaluation of a range of information sources and the mental flexibility to pursue alternate avenues as new understanding develops. Developing familiarity with the sources of evidence, methods, and modes of discourse in the field assists novice learners to enter the conversation. Students have a greater role and responsibility in creating new knowledge, in understanding the contours and the changing dynamics of the world of information, and in using information, data, and scholarship ethically. Novice learners may need to rely on basic indicators of authority, such as type of publication or author credentials, where experts recognize schools of thought or discipline-specific paradigms. The Framework offered here is called a framework intentionally because it is based on a cluster of interconnected core concepts, with flexible options for implementation, rather than on a set of standards or learning outcomes, or any prescriptive enumeration of skills. Some content may be under embargo. More specifically, a disposition is a cluster of preferences, attitudes, and intentions, as well as a set of capabilities that allow the preferences to become realized in a particular way. The Library of Congress is making its Web Archives Collection available for educational and research purposes. Instead of seeking discrete answers to complex problems, experts understand that a given issue may be characterized by several competing perspectives as part of an ongoing conversation in which information users and creators come together and negotiate meaning. Includes bibliographical references. Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson. According to the American Library Association’s Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education, information literacy is the ability to “recognize when information is needed and . These standards were reviewed by the ACRL Standards Committee and approved by the Board of Directors of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) on January 18, 2000, at the Midwinter Meeting of the American Library Association in San Antonio, Texas. You are responsible for deciding whether your use of the items in this collection is legal. Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education These standards were reviewed by the ACRL Standards Committee and approved by the Board of Directors of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) on January 18, 2000, at the Midwinter Meeting of the American Library Association in San Antonio, Texas. Information in any format is produced to convey a message and is shared via a selected delivery method. (Rotterdam, Netherlands: Sense Publishers, 2010). Experts view authority with an attitude of informed skepticism and an openness to new perspectives, additional voices, and changes in schools of thought. ISTE serves more than 100,000 education stakeholders throughout the... International Society for Technology in Education. Metaliteracy expands the scope of traditional information skills (determine, access, locate, understand, produce, and use information) to include the collaborative production and sharing of information in participatory digital environments (collaborate, produce, and share). Researchers should consult the sites themselves for information about rights, contacts, and permissions. Following in January 2000, the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) published Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. 7. Chicago, IL 60601. (Chicago: Neal-Schuman, 2014). Mastery of the information literacy skills addressed by the Standards, such as the ability to recognize an information need and The Framework opens the way for librarians, faculty, and other institutional partners to redesign instruction sessions, assignments, courses, and even curricula; to connect information literacy with student success initiatives; to collaborate on pedagogical research and involve students themselves in that research; and to create wider conversations about student learning, the scholarship of teaching and learning, and the assessment of learning on local campuses and beyond. Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education, 1 academic librarians and their partners in higher education associations have developed learning outcomes, tools, and resources that some institutions have deployed to infuse information literacy concepts and skills into their curricula. Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education The Association of College and Research Libraries A division of the American Library Association Teaching faculty have a greater responsibility in designing curricula and assignments that foster enhanced engagement with the core ideas about information and scholarship within their disciplines. Novice learners may search a limited set of resources, while experts may search more broadly and deeply to determine the most appropriate information within the project scope. The Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education (originally approved in 2000) were rescinded by the ACRL Board of Directors on June 25, 2016, at the 2016 ALA Annual Conference in Orlando, Florida, which means they are no longer in force. The information creation process could result in a range of information formats and modes of delivery, so experts look beyond format when selecting resources to use. Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe. Authority is constructed in that various communities may recognize different types of authority. Knowledge practices are the proficiencies or abilities that learners develop as a result of their comprehending a threshold concept. Get this from a library! Encompassing inquiry, discovery, and serendipity, searching identifies both possible relevant sources as well as the means to access those sources. Metacognition is an awareness and understanding of one’s own thought processes. Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education provides a framework for assessing the information literate student. Filed by the ACRL Board on February 2, 2015. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, . More about Copyright and Other Restrictions. Introduction. Watch Queue Queue. This document presents the Association of College and Research Libraries' (ACRL's) Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education, which were developed in 1999 by an ACRL Task Force working with the academic library community, teaching faculty, academic officers in higher education, and chief officers of the regional accrediting associations. Librarians have a greater responsibility in identifying core ideas within their own knowledge domain that can extend learning for students, in creating a new cohesive curriculum for information literacy, and in collaborating more extensively with faculty. (Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, 2004). This Framework depends on these core ideas of metaliteracy, with special focus on metacognition,9 or critical self-reflection, as crucial to becoming more self-directed in that rapidly changing ecosystem. formulate questions for research based on information gaps or on reexamination of existing, possibly conflicting, information; determine an appropriate scope of investigation; deal with complex research by breaking complex questions into simple ones, limiting the scope of investigations; use various research methods, based on need, circumstance, and type of inquiry; monitor gathered information and assess for gaps or weaknesses; synthesize ideas gathered from multiple sources; draw reasonable conclusions based on the analysis and interpretation of information. ACRL's Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education (hereafter referred to as the Standards) were published in 2000 and have had wide acceptance by librarians in colleges and universities in the United States and Canada and beyond.Many librarians base their information literacy (IL) instruction programs and assessment instruments on the Standards. Because this Framework envisions information literacy as extending the arc of learning throughout students’ academic careers and as converging with other academic and social learning goals, an expanded definition of information literacy is offered here to emphasize dynamism, flexibility, individual growth, and community learning: Information literacy is the set of integrated abilities encompassing the reflective discovery of information, the understanding of how information is produced and valued, and the use of information in creating new knowledge and participating ethically in communities of learning. 225 N. Michigan Ave. Suite 1300 Web Page. Elements that affect or reflect on the creation, such as a pre- or post-publication editing or reviewing process, may be indicators of quality. Some content may be protected under international law. Expedited shipping is available for an additional charge. 9. Information literacy competency standards for higher education. United States. Some sites in this collection may be restricted to onsite access only; see the Access Condition statement in each item record for more information. Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. The Framework is organized into six frames, each consisting of a concept central to information literacy, a set of knowledge practices, and a set of dispositions. This Revision Task Force is charged with reviewing and revising the current ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education, that were Adopted by the ACRL Board, January 11, 2016. Threshold concepts can be thought of as portals through which the learner must pass in order to develop new perspectives and wider understanding. develop and maintain an open mind when encountering varied and sometimes conflicting perspectives; motivate themselves to find authoritative sources, recognizing that authority may be conferred or manifested in unexpected ways; develop awareness of the importance of assessing content with a skeptical stance and with a self-awareness of their own biases and worldview; question traditional notions of granting authority and recognize the value of diverse ideas and worldviews; are conscious that maintaining these attitudes and actions requires frequent self-evaluation. Maybe that’s over-simplistic, but I think he has a point. During the fifteen years since the publication of the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education,1 academic librarians and their partners in higher education associations have developed learning outcomes, tools, and resources that some institutions have deployed to infuse information literacy concepts and skills into their curricula. consider research as open-ended exploration and engagement with information; appreciate that a question may appear to be simple but still disruptive and important to research; value intellectual curiosity in developing questions and learning new investigative methods; maintain an open mind and a critical stance; value persistence, adaptability, and flexibility and recognize that ambiguity can benefit the research process; seek multiple perspectives during information gathering and assessment; follow ethical and legal guidelines in gathering and using information; demonstrate intellectual humility (i.e., recognize their own intellectual or experiential limitations). undergraduates is founded on the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education (hereafter referred to as the Standards) designed by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) in 2000.

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